Award-Winning Data Management, Analytics, Automation, and Integration Platform

ZE has the only award-winning solution that offers a complete end-to-end automated data, analytics and integration platform.

Accurate data is vital and an effective data management solution is a crucial piece of deploying the IT systems that run business applications and provide analytical information to make smarter risk management, trading, and operational decision-making. Increase productivity and efficiencies while eliminating high operations cost and complex siloed data sources.

Discover How Our Data Management Solutions Can Work for You

Maximize your margins. Accelerate greater productivity and ROI by being able to do more with less. Have the competitive advantage through an efficient integrated IT and analytic infrastructure with in-depth market insights.

Business Pain

Unify Data Management, Integration and Analytics

Your mission to your organization is to deliver the most value, securing a competitive advantage in the market by capturing and analyzing data. With the right sources, limitless access to data, the right tools, and the right service, ZE delivers the value you're looking for when critical business, trading, risk management decisions are demanded on an enterprise-wide basis.

Is your data homeless?

A complete aggregated data and analytics platform that breaks down your data silos.

Fragmentation got you down?

A complete data ecosystem means we're your one stop shop.

Don't know who to turn to?

We're here to help you scale with the support you need.

Living in a manual world?

We're fully optimized for data automation, making time-wasting repetitive tasks a thing of the past.

Who else uses our services?

We do. We believe in what we make, so we run on our award wining ZE Cloud too.

Feeling disconnected?

We're dedicating to providing you with personalized service from real people. Book a discovery call with ZEMA expert.

ZE Works

We build value from the ground up.

With the right sources, the right tools, and the right service, ZE delivers the value you're looking for when investing in robust and cost efficient data management and integration solution for the energy, commodity, and other data-driven organizations.

ZEMA eliminates resource heavy intraday and end-of-day processes

Automation

ZEMA automates the entire data pipeline for you. From the collection from thousands of sources to the downstream system integration and everything in between. Business critical data processes, such as validation, transformation, data modeling, data automation, curve management, publishing, reporting etc., can be easily configured and automated with ZEMA so your users can spend more time on their jobs and less time wrangling data.

World

See what's happening

Find us at trade shows, seminars, and other events. Learn how we can integrate with your sucess strategy.

  • Events
  • News
  • Blog
  • ZE DataWatch
  • Join us in person

    Find a ZE or ZEMA-related event near you soon.

    ZE is attending Virtual Global Power Markets

    Virtual
    April 12, 2021

    View Details
    ZE is attending Global Executive Petroleum Virtual Conference

    Virtual
    June 24, 2021

    View Details
    ZE is Sponsoring at the Mid-c Seminar 2021

    Virtual
    July 13, 2021

    View Details

    ZE in the News

    We're making headlines. Here's what you hear about ZE and ZEMA in the news.

    ZE PowerGroup Declared one of the Top Small & Medium Employers for 2021 and 2021 Canada’s Best Employers for Recent Graduates

    ZE PowerGroup Inc. (ZE), a global leader in end-to-end data management and analytics technology and services, has been selected as one of the top Small & Medium Employers for 2021 and 2021 Canada’s Best Employers for Recent Graduates. This award recognizes ZE as being one of the best places to work in Canada for new […]

    Read More
    ZE PowerGroup Inc. Recognized for the 2021 Cloud Enterprise Data Warehouse (EDW) Solution of the Year Data Breakthrough Award

    ZE PowerGroup Inc. (ZE), the leading software development firm specializing in enterprise data management, integration and analysis solutions for energy and commodities markets, today announced that it has been selected as the winner of the “Cloud Enterprise Data Warehouse (EDW) Solution of the Year” award in the 2021 Data Breakthrough Awards program conducted by Data […]

    Read More
    ZE PowerGroup and Kpler Announce Partnership to Provide Increased Access to Kpler Commodity Data

    ZE PowerGroup Inc. (ZE) and Kpler are excited to join hands and offer customers quick and easy access to Kpler data. ZE PowerGroup is a one-of-a-kind business with an exceptional global reputation, specializing in data management and analytics. The company caters to the unique needs of organizations across industries from finance and commodity to energy […]

    Read More

    What we have to say

    Read our blog to learn more about ZE, ZEMA, and how we're revolutionizing the market for our clients around the world.

    Europe’s energy transition commits to a green hydrogen future

    Europe’s transition to a zero-carbon future is well underway. Greenhouse gas emissions have fallen by 20% since 2005, according to World Bank data, and the EU is now targeting net zero emissions by 2050.

    The largest share of emissions globally is generated by the power sector, and this is where efforts have focused over the last 15 years. Through the Renewable Energy Directive, the Energy Efficiency Directive, and the Emissions Trading Directive the European Union has harnessed the power of regulation and of markets to drive a nearly 16% reduction in consumption of all fossil fuels between 2005 and 2018.

    Over the same period, consumption of energy from renewable sources and bio-fuels has risen by nearly 85%.

    This start of an energy transition is being embedded in long-term EU policy, through the proposals for a Green Deal and a Climate Law which will formalise the goals of achieving significant reductions in greenhouse gas emissions towards the achievement of net-zero emissions by the middle of the century.

    National political decisions have helped to underpin this ambition. Three EU member states have already closed all their coal plants, while eight others have never had significant coal-fired capacity. Ten more are intending to exit coal by 2030, and Germany and Poland have set deadlines after 2030.

    Current plant economics data show that burning coal to generate electricity loses money for utilities, while using gas remains profitable.

    The EU’s Emissions Trading System has played a key role by raising the cost of incumbent fossil generation to the point where new technologies like wind and solar have been able to compete. Now that these renewable technologies are able to compete with fossil generation without subsidy, nobody is building coal-fired plants in Europe, and even new gas plants are being canceled.

    Earlier in March Drax, formerly one of the UK’s biggest coal generators, scrapped plans to build Europe’s  largest gas-fired plant, and agreed to sell its remaining gas-fired units. Instead it will focus on biomass and carbon capture, hoping to sequester more CO2 than it generates, and so become “carbon-positive”.

    To be sure, gas-fired generation still has a significant future in Europe, particularly in countries where coal generation dominates: Poland, Romania and Bulgaria, for example. But elsewhere, the focus is shifting beyond even natural gas.

    As renewables continue to make sizeable inroads into power generation across the continent, most of the attention among politicians and companies has begun to shift to replacing the use of fossil fuels in industrial processes. The focus is now on bringing hydrogen to a central role as a zero-carbon alternative.

    The EU in 2020 published a hydrogen strategy document that outlines how the bloc hopes to support and incentivize a shift to hydrogen for industrial applications. In response there have been a slew of announcements in recent months of investments into hydrogen.

    Hydrogen emits no carbon dioxide – just water vapor – when burned. It has a high energy content by weight, though less by volume, and needs to be stored at high pressure. It’s not easy to transport either, since it can corrode metal pipelines.

    Hydrogen is most commonly manufactured by steam-reforming methane (natural gas) or by coal gasification, processes that emit CO2. Many of the current projects to boost hydrogen output are based on steam reforming, with the end product becoming known as “grey” hydrogen.

    By capturing and storing the CO2 emissions underground, “grey” hydrogen becomes “blue” hydrogen, a the greenhouse gases are not allowed to enter the atmosphere.

    However, the ultimate goal is to make hydrogen through a process of electrolysis, in which the power supply comes from a renewable source. The resulting hydrogen stream is commonly referred to as “green”, since no CO2 emissions are produced.

    Manufacture of steel, cement and petrochemicals are all energy-intensive processes that currently require coal or natural gas as sources of energy. The production processes themselves also generate carbon dioxide.

    For example, the steelmaking process reacts iron ore with carbon monoxide from burning coke to produce pig iron and CO2. Burning hydrogen instead of coke produces pig iron and water vapour.

    It’s processes like this that are driving European governments to develop strategies to boost hydrogen, and companies to invest heavily in hydrogen production.

    “”In 2020, six European countries and the European Commission released hydrogen strategies amid the COVID-19 crisis, in most cases as part of a green recovery plan,” IHS Markit wrote in its quarterly Power-to-X report. The company expects blue and green hydrogen investments in five countries – France, Germany, Italy, Portugal, and Spain – to top $44 billion by 2030.

    “Hydrogen development is tied directly to decarbonization,” IHS Markit said. “What Europe has done in the last six months is to begin to put in place the financing framework for hydrogen. If hydrogen going to take off, it needs to have [incentive] schemes, like renewable power.”

    In its Hydrogen Strategy document published last year, the European Commission targeted an increase in electrolyser capacity from less than 1 GW today to 40GW by 2030 and identified a wide range of support measures to enable green hydrogen to become cost-competitive by the end of the decade.

    Not only does hydrogen need incentives to boost renewable power capacity, but it also requires higher costs for using fossil fuels. The Commission strategy estimated that in order to make blue hydrogen – made using natural gas combined with carbon capture – cost-competitive with grey hydrogen today would require a price of carbon between €55-90/tonne, far in excess of current prices (€42-43/tonne).

    Th current review of the EU ETS is expected to produce legislative proposals this summer to tighten the carbon market and set a course for prices to reach these levels over the course of the decade.

    There are also opportunities for green hydrogen to make inroads into the use of fossil fuels for transportation, though production costs will need to fall even further to make this possible. Analysts and experts see the potential for some limited applications in public transport but are more doubtful that hydrogen will or even should replace electric vehicles.

    View Article
    EU carbon prices set new records amid speculative buying

    The EU Emissions Trading System (EU ETS) has had a tumultuous start to 2021. Prices have risen by 22% to new record highs in the last six weeks as a wave of speculative investment has come into the market, and industrial and utility compliance companies have been shoved to the sidelines.

    The rally is part of a longer-term trend that has seen the price of EU emissions allowances (EUAs) soar by 73% since November 2 last year. Over the same period, the number of financial and speculative entities holding positions in EUAs has leapt from 308 to 426, according to ICE Futures data.

    EUA CHART

    What has driven this wave of investment in carbon?

    Many experts attribute the renewed popularity of EUAs to political ambition by the EU. Last year incoming Commission president Ursula von der Leyen announced the 27-nation bloc would adopt a goal of achieving “net zero” emissions by 2050, and implement a Green Deal to transform the European economy.

    A significant portion of the burden will be borne by he energy sector, through EU initiatives including directives covering renewable energy and energy efficiency, but industry will also face tougher emissions trading goals.

    In 2017 lawmakers agreed to set a goal of cutting greenhouse gas emissions by 40% from 1990 levels by 2030. However, under the Green Deal that target will this year be raised to 55% or potentially even 60% by 2030, and an interim target will be set for 2040 on the way to net zero in 2050.

    The European Commission will table legislative proposals to achieve these goals in the summer, and they will represent a significant tightening of the parameters of the EU ETS.

    What changes are coming?

    According to an impact assessment published by the commission last year, the annual cap on emissions in the EU ETS would need to be adjusted to account for a steeper reduction trajectory to 2030. But because the so-called linear reduction factor (LRF) – the annual reduction – has already been set at a 2.2% decrease from 2021 to 2025, lawmakers will have to consider a much steeper LRF after 2025.

    Some experts say the LRF would need to be raised to 6.8% from 2025, or that the EU would need to make a one-off reduction in the cap of 363 million EUAs starting from 2026. For comparison, the EU ETS cap in 2021 stands at 1.57 billion EUAs.

    Other elements could include making adjustments to the Market Stability Reserve (MSR), the mechanism that adjusts market supply each year by removing a proportion of the calculated surplus EUAs in circulation.

    The MSR presently withdraw 24% of the surplus each year, and is scheduled to continue at 24% until 2023, when it will revert to 12%. It’s possible the EU may decide to extend the 24% rate for an additional period to take up even more of the surplus in a shorter period. As more and more coal-fired power plants are closing,  emissions are expected to drop more sharply in the EU, and a flexible MSR is considered by some to be the best way to manage supply.

    The EU is also considering including emissions from maritime transport, buildings and road transport in the EU ETS, though it’s not yet clear what impact these sectors would have on demand and supply.

    Analysts have predicted that with these tighter targets, EUA prices could reach as much as €80 towards the end of the decade.

    Back to the market…

    While the overall trend in carbon prices has been to a large extent a function of political ambition and investors’ reaction to those signals as described above, there are plenty of fundamental drivers that are also driving higher prices.

    Chief among these has been energy prices. 2020 saw an armada of LNG cargoes from the US push European gas prices down by as much as 55%. Cheaper gas combined with rising carbon prices helped push coal-fired generation into negative margins.

    Since October 2020, all energy markets have enjoyed a recovery that has taken front-month natural gas in particular from around €13.18/MWh to as much as €20/MWh in February, an increase of more than 57%. But because coal prices have risen too, but by only 15%, more efficient coal plants have begun to be favoured, again boosting fundamental demand.

    MONTH-AHEAD SPREADS CHARTS

    To be sure, coal fired power is still uncompetitive for generation in 2022 and later, and it may well be that once the current spell of colder weather ends, nearer-dated generation spreads for 2021 may also revert to favouring natural gas.

    Other fundamental factors are related to physical supply and demand. As the market entered a new trading phase in 2021, the European Commission has had to recalculate the parameters for allocating free EUAs to industries at risk of carbon leakage (relocating abroad to jurisdictions with fewer penalties on carbon emissions).

    The process of calculation has taken longer than expected, with the result that industrial installations have not been told how many free EUAs they will receive this year, nor have any been issued. The normal deadline for such issuance is at the end of February, but the Commission has said it may only start to hand out EUAs from the second quarter of the year.

    While all participants in the EU ETS won’t need to surrender their 2021 EUAs until April 2022, the psychological impact of the delay may be impacting prices.

    Another contributing factor is that installations cannot use 2021-issued EUAs to surrender for their 2020 compliance, which will take place in March and April this year. Typically, companies have been able to “borrow” new EUAs to pay off older compliance debts, but this has been specifically ruled out for 2020 compliance.

    Already there are signs of industrial companies that have been caught out by this rule, and the anticipation of “distressed” buying up to the April 30 deadline has helped support EUA prices. Trading sources expect that a premium will emerge for 2020-eligible EUAs in the coming two months.

    But most traders agree that by far the biggest driver has been speculative buying. After articles about carbon prices appeared on both Bloomberg and the Financial Times in the same week, prices leaped even higher as new money entered the market and, despite a brief reversal last week, the EU ETS looks set to consolidate its gains in the coming weeks.

    View Article
    Congratulations to the 2020 Global Energy Awards Winners and the Finalists!

    Energy companies from 10 countries, spanning 4 continents, received honors for leadership, innovation and exemplary performance in 2020 at the annual Platts Global Energy Awards event held Virtually on December 10.

    Hosted by celebrity Jason Alexander (George from Seinfeld TV show), the winners were announced virtually, and we had a virtual table with members of the Platts Channel Partners team being the hosts at the ZE Table.

    This Energy Awards honored organizations and individuals in the energy industry who are dedicated to achieving excellence. This year’s winners and finalists represents the best of the best in the industry.

    Dr. Zak was a finalist for the Lifetime Achievement award and the list of finalists was impressive with Dawood Al-Dawood, Vice President-Northern Area Oil Operations at Saudi Aramco being the winner.

    It should be noted that Dr. Zak was the ONLY Technology company represented on the list.

    Lifetime Achievement Award Finalist were:
    • George Sakellaris, Ameresco
    • Dr. Debesh Chandra Patra, Bharat Petroleum Corporation
    • Kate Chisholm, Capital Power
    • Tan Sri Ngau Boon Keat, Dialog Group
    • Rt Hon The Lord Barker of Battle, En+ Group
    • Rocky Plemons, Fluor Corporation
    • Prabhat Singh, Petronet LNG
    • Dawood Al-Dawood, Saudi Aramco
    • Augustine ‘Austin’ Avuru, Seplat
    • Dr. Zak El-Ramly, ZE PowerGroup

    View Article
    View All ZE Blogs

    Visit our blog to read all of our articles.

    Visit Blog

    Join us for webinar

    Find a ZE or partners webinar, and get register.

    Webinar: Mitigating spot market risk for Latin America’s LNG buyers

    May 12, 2021 00:May PST

    View details
    A Panel Discussion: The Rise of Analytics and their Impact in Energy & Freight Markets

    April 27, 2021 00:Apr PST

    View details

    Subscribe to ZE DataWatch Newsletter

    ZE DataWatch is a report comprised of data updates and expectations for energy and commodity markets.

    Subscribe

    * indicates required
    Keep up-to-date with ZEMA product and services

    Our Partners

    To learn more about how you can benefit from being a ZE Partner, Let us know about you and your partnership interests.

  • All
  • Consulting
  • Data
  • Technology
  • Consulting
    Consulting
    Consulting
    Consulting
    Data
    Data
    Data
    Data
    Data
    Data
    Data
    Data
    Data
    Data
    Data
    Data
    Data
    Data
    Technology
    Technology
    Technology
    Technology
    Technology
    Technology
    Technology
    Technology